Tag Archives: RealD

HFR, New ‘Silver Screen’ and 2 Hobbit Projectors

HFR will finally be presented to a public audience during the Hobbit release in Wellington on 28 November. But that’s not all.

They will see the movie with 12 foot Lamberts of light (what most of the world calls 41 candelas per square meter) courtesy of a dual projection system designed by Christie.

And, they will watch it on a newly introduced “polarization preserving screen” that was described at the October SMPTE meeting during a presentation by RealD. It is described as having no hot spot and 40 degrees of Half Gain Angle (HGA) on a 1.5 gain screen. To compare, the typical ‘silver’ screen used with passive stereoscopic 3D systems has an HGA of 23 degrees using a 2.5 gain screen. 

Lest it is forgotten, the technical reason for ‘silver’ screens is that they hold the polarization required for passive 3D systems. The gain comes for other reasons…like, not enough light to the eyes. But since most people in the cinema sit near or beyond the half gain line where the typical 3 or 4 ftL emission is already down to a mesopic 1.5 or 2 and growing progressively less, the HGA of 40 is phenomenal. If the center seats are actually seeing 12, those 20 degrees away will be seeing 6. (Of course, that brings up the topic of what the movie was mastered at, but we’ll let that be a different article. Any volunteer authors?)

When the SMPTE Tech Event presentation papers are available, look for High Performance Polarization-Based-3D and 2D Presentation. For now you will have to be satisfied with the patent document: 

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HFR, New ‘Silver Screen’ and 2 Hobbit Projectors

HFR will finally be presented to a public audience during the Hobbit release in Wellington on 28 November. But that’s not all.

They will see the movie with 12 foot Lamberts of light (what most of the world calls 41 candelas per square meter) courtesy of a dual projection system designed by Christie.

And, they will watch it on a newly introduced “polarization preserving screen” that was described at the October SMPTE meeting during a presentation by RealD. It is described as having no hot spot and 40 degrees of Half Gain Angle (HGA) on a 1.5 gain screen. To compare, the typical ‘silver’ screen used with passive stereoscopic 3D systems has an HGA of 23 degrees using a 2.5 gain screen. 

Lest it is forgotten, the technical reason for ‘silver’ screens is that they hold the polarization required for passive 3D systems. The gain comes for other reasons…like, not enough light to the eyes. But since most people in the cinema sit near or beyond the half gain line where the typical 3 or 4 ftL emission is already down to a mesopic 1.5 or 2 and growing progressively less, the HGA of 40 is phenomenal. If the center seats are actually seeing 12, those 20 degrees away will be seeing 6. (Of course, that brings up the topic of what the movie was mastered at, but we’ll let that be a different article. Any volunteer authors?)

When the SMPTE Tech Event presentation papers are available, look for High Performance Polarization-Based-3D and 2D Presentation. For now you will have to be satisfied with the patent document: 

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[Reply: NATO] Sony and the Un-free glasses

[Updated] Sony Pictures has announced that beginning in summer 2012 they will not be paying for the RealD glasses anymore. It was a legacy issue that had promised to leave for a long time anyway, and with Spiderman and Men In Black III coming out, it isn’t like the exhibitors are going to say ‘screw it, no movies from you.’ 

Interesting side note is that the Sony projector system can only use the RealD system…well, it only uses the RealD system – they could as easily have chosen a better system that doesn’t use a light pulverising silver screen, but they didn’t go that way.

[Sperling has an excellent article at: Celluloid Junkie » A Deeper Look At Sony’s Battle With Exhibitors Over 3D Glasses

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[Update] Scathing 2D/3D Light Boston.com Article…True?

Update – A response has hit the interwebs, sometimes alleged to be a Sony press release. It doesn’t seem likely, but it is a defense nonetheless and explains many of the points (not all) made in the Boston Globe article. It is posted in its entirety at the bottom of this article. [End Update]

Sony projectors with RealD systems take a perceived hit in a Boston Globe article available at: A movie lover’s plea: Let there be light – Boston.com. Claims are made that, by virtue of using a Sony/RealD 3D lens pair – instead of a 2D lens – during 2D presentations with a Sony Projector, that only 85% of the intended light is getting to the patron in the seats. It seems like dodgy science, extrapolating some data and using some flawed common wisdom – some measurements would be grand.

Between all the ads, one might miss the link for what also seems to be a very fact-challenged graphic: Graphic – How a 3-D lens affects a 2-D movie -Boston.com

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RealD and Polaroid — Possible Promise PR

Polaroid 3D GlassesGlasses are required for all versions of 3D cinema systems. There are several reasons for this, and except for a few unique circumstances, this will also apply to home theater for a long time. Most 3D glasses come from the equipment manufacturers, which are built to handle “one size fits all” abuse. In the past year there have been companies offering alternative glasses, personalized glasses, so to speak. But Polaroid’s announcement yesterday gives the subject a new potential, in this case, for the polarized lens systems of RealD and MasterImage.

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RealD Gets Serious with IPO – UPdate

RealD Logo

It happened; Oversold is a bad thing on airplanes, but a good thing for RealD; Reuters reports that RealD’s IPO raised 33% more than expected – 12.5 million shares are sold vs 10.75 expected, at $16 per share vs $13-$15/share range expected. 

The total therefore is $200,000,000 in, minus costs and minus the amount that shareholders were selling (which is 52% of the sale, of which the late Roy Disney’s Shamrock Capital Advisors sold 1.4 million shares, according to Businessweek.

As chronicled later in this running diary, the original expectation when filing the S1 was for “up to $200 million” in sales, for a valuation of 1 billion dollars. So, in the end, a nicely managed IPO. 

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