Category Archives: Consultants

Another Future of Film

It seemed impossible that another view of Entertainment Technology focusing on the “Future of Film” was possible (or required) after 4 days of CinemaCon, 3 days of SMPTE Future of Cinema and 4 days of NAB, and a full weekly dose of Industry News from the Showbiz Sandbox podcast. But like a football replay from a stadium ringed with simultaneously exposing cameras, rocking back and forth over some hidden angles was beneficial – the Digital Hollywood event titled The Future of Film filled in several hidden holes in the very complicated perspective.

Originally posted at Celluloid Junkie: Another Future of Film

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Another Future of Film

It seemed impossible that another view of Entertainment Technology focusing on the “Future of Film” was possible (or required) after 4 days of CinemaCon, 3 days of SMPTE Future of Cinema and 4 days of NAB, and a full weekly dose of Industry News from the Showbiz Sandbox podcast. But like a football replay from a stadium ringed with simultaneously exposing cameras, rocking back and forth over some hidden angles was beneficial – the Digital Hollywood event titled The Future of Film filled in several hidden holes in the very complicated perspective.

Originally posted at Celluloid Junkie: Another Future of Film

[……]

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2020 Details from Barco Demo w/CineTech Geek

The Future of Better Pixels has many vectors, most brilliantly steradianed by a projector with a laser light engine pushing out the photons. Not only are more able to be more efficiently used before burning up the system, but they can be effected to deliver a wider gamut so we can enjoy those deep muddy browns, those barely red brick colors in the shadows and some very heady Hawaiian Blue Hibiscus…which according to the shirt I saw are actually a Cyan mixed with Riviera Mediterranean.

Notwithstanding, Mr. CineTech Geek – James Gardiner – organized a Barco presentation recently, then put it on the interwebz for us all to learn from. Great conversations, great data and great thanks for the great amount of work that went into this. Extra bagels for this man while at CinemaCon.[……]

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2020 Details from Barco Demo w/CineTech Geek

The Future of Better Pixels has many vectors, most brilliantly steradianed by a projector with a laser light engine pushing out the photons. Not only are more able to be more efficiently used before burning up the system, but they can be effected to deliver a wider gamut so we can enjoy those deep muddy browns, those barely red brick colors in the shadows and some very heady Hawaiian Blue Hibiscus…which according to the shirt I saw are actually a Cyan mixed with Riviera Mediterranean.

Notwithstanding, Mr. CineTech Geek – James Gardiner – organized a Barco presentation recently, then put it on the interwebz for us all to learn from. Great conversations, great data and great thanks for the great amount of work that went into this. Extra bagels for this man while at CinemaCon.[……]

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The DCP USB on a Mac; CineTechGeek to Digital Cinema Tools, v1b

James Garner posts another timely and excellent video piece on Cine Tech Geeks about making a DCP on a Mac. See: How to Read/Write to Cinema DCP disk on Mac or Windows. To get it to a listenable length (18 minutes), James gets straight to the point, telling and showing the interested what to do and what to expect while creating a non-permanent Linux (Ubuntu 14) system, and the steps beyond. Of course, it presumes some knowledge and appreciation of nuance, skipping over parts that the average joe may not be able to get past.

Being the certified ‘dullest crayon in the drawer’, and having fought for hours to get a very similar set-up, this article gives a slower glimpse and goes a bit deeper into other tools that can be used once the basic system is made. 

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The DCP USB on a Mac; CineTechGeek to Digital Cinema Tools, v1b

James Garner posts another timely and excellent video piece on Cine Tech Geeks about making a DCP on a Mac. See: How to Read/Write to Cinema DCP disk on Mac or Windows. To get it to a listenable length (18 minutes), James gets straight to the point, telling and showing the interested what to do and what to expect while creating a non-permanent Linux (Ubuntu 14) system, and the steps beyond. Of course, it presumes some knowledge and appreciation of nuance, skipping over parts that the average joe may not be able to get past.

Being the certified ‘dullest crayon in the drawer’, and having fought for hours to get a very similar set-up, this article gives a slower glimpse and goes a bit deeper into other tools that can be used once the basic system is made. 

[……]

Read more

The DCP USB on a Mac; CineTechGeek to Digital Cinema Tools, v1b

James Garner posts another timely and excellent video piece on Cine Tech Geeks about making a DCP on a Mac. See: How to Read/Write to Cinema DCP disk on Mac or Windows. To get it to a listenable length (18 minutes), James gets straight to the point, telling and showing the interested what to do and what to expect while creating a non-permanent Linux (Ubuntu 14) system, and the steps beyond. Of course, it presumes some knowledge and appreciation of nuance, skipping over parts that the average joe may not be able to get past.

Being the certified ‘dullest crayon in the drawer’, and having fought for hours to get a very similar set-up, this article gives a slower glimpse and goes a bit deeper into other tools that can be used once the basic system is made. 

[……]

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Soundly Said | Mel Lambert Gets Immersive

Before CinemaCon is NAB. Before NAB is a SMPTE gathering on Technology In Cinema. Thousands travel to this annual event that is fashioned to give detail to what would otherwise be mere rumors to those who have to make a living in the post and broadcast fields – so this is knowledge dissemination by SMTPE at its best.

Mel Lambert has been writing articles on Immersive Sound for the Film Editors Guild and others for the past two years. Having attended the SMTPE event, he brings us more nuance to understand how this technology will affect the cinema auditorium.

D-Cinema Summit: standardization of immersive sound formats

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Soundly Said | Mel Lambert Gets Immersive

Before CinemaCon is NAB. Before NAB is a SMPTE gathering on Technology In Cinema. Thousands travel to this annual event that is fashioned to give detail to what would otherwise be mere rumors to those who have to make a living in the post and broadcast fields – so this is knowledge dissemination by SMTPE at its best.

Mel Lambert has been writing articles on Immersive Sound for the Film Editors Guild and others for the past two years. Having attended the SMTPE event, he brings us more nuance to understand how this technology will affect the cinema auditorium.

D-Cinema Summit: standardization of immersive sound formats

[……]

Read more

Kommer Kleijn On the Importance of the DCP

Kommer Kleijn brings insight to the value of the DCP. Copied with his permission.


Recently there was a mail thread on the ISDCF reflector that included the following superb response from  to a paragraph. I am writing this as a cinematographer and as a representative of IMAGO, The European Federation of Cinematographers. 

I can fully understand any festival which wants open, non-encrypted ProRes (or any other common codec) files for playing them “risk free” from a cheap playback system. The festival poeple can check the movies beforehand, if necessary at home. Ok, there is a risk of pirarcy here. But that is always there. Small movies will hardly have the legal power to follow up a piracy copy made from a DCP projection. And Hollywood doesn’t send movies to small festivals…

I know many people see encryption as the only important difference between DCP and other formats, but please let us not forget that the DCP format provides SEVERAL major functionalities (a part from image quality) that other electronic picture formats do not have.

One family of functionality is, for sure, piracy protection and the auto-destruct (time-limit) function, both provided by the encryption and KDM system.

However, another very important difference between a DCP and any other video system or file formats is what we call ‘The calibrated Chain‘.

[……]

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Kommer Kleijn On the Importance of the DCP

Kommer Kleijn brings insight to the value of the DCP. Copied with his permission.


Recently there was a mail thread on the ISDCF reflector that included the following superb response from  to a paragraph. I am writing this as a cinematographer and as a representative of IMAGO, The European Federation of Cinematographers. 

I can fully understand any festival which wants open, non-encrypted ProRes (or any other common codec) files for playing them “risk free” from a cheap playback system. The festival poeple can check the movies beforehand, if necessary at home. Ok, there is a risk of pirarcy here. But that is always there. Small movies will hardly have the legal power to follow up a piracy copy made from a DCP projection. And Hollywood doesn’t send movies to small festivals…

I know many people see encryption as the only important difference between DCP and other formats, but please let us not forget that the DCP format provides SEVERAL major functionalities (a part from image quality) that other electronic picture formats do not have.

One family of functionality is, for sure, piracy protection and the auto-destruct (time-limit) function, both provided by the encryption and KDM system.

However, another very important difference between a DCP and any other video system or file formats is what we call ‘The calibrated Chain‘.

[……]

Read more