Tag Archives: light

More Quality Assurance From USL

As mentioned in the ShowEast wrap-up from last year, USL is introducing the LSS-100 at CineEurope next week.

Instead of a hand-held unit like the Harkness Digital Screen Checker, and the Meyer/NTi Cinema Audio Analyzer [also being introduced this week at CineEurope (Testing!!! Audio Quality Control Possible (Meyer Sound)], the LSS-100 allows theater owners to continuously monitor on-screen technical performance.

[……]

Read more

More Quality Assurance From USL

As mentioned in the ShowEast wrap-up from last year, USL is introducing the LSS-100 at CineEurope next week.

Instead of a hand-held unit like the Harkness Digital Screen Checker, and the Meyer/NTi Cinema Audio Analyzer [also being introduced this week at CineEurope (Testing!!! Audio Quality Control Possible (Meyer Sound)], the LSS-100 allows theater owners to continuously monitor on-screen technical performance.

[……]

Read more

More Quality Assurance From USL

As mentioned in the ShowEast wrap-up from last year, USL is introducing the LSS-100 at CineEurope next week.

Instead of a hand-held unit like the Harkness Digital Screen Checker, and the Meyer/NTi Cinema Audio Analyzer [also being introduced this week at CineEurope (Testing!!! Audio Quality Control Possible (Meyer Sound)], the LSS-100 allows theater owners to continuously monitor on-screen technical performance.

[……]

Read more

[Update] Scathing 2D/3D Light Boston.com Article…True?

Update – A response has hit the interwebs, sometimes alleged to be a Sony press release. It doesn’t seem likely, but it is a defense nonetheless and explains many of the points (not all) made in the Boston Globe article. It is posted in its entirety at the bottom of this article. [End Update]

Sony projectors with RealD systems take a perceived hit in a Boston Globe article available at: A movie lover’s plea: Let there be light – Boston.com. Claims are made that, by virtue of using a Sony/RealD 3D lens pair – instead of a 2D lens – during 2D presentations with a Sony Projector, that only 85% of the intended light is getting to the patron in the seats. It seems like dodgy science, extrapolating some data and using some flawed common wisdom – some measurements would be grand.

Between all the ads, one might miss the link for what also seems to be a very fact-challenged graphic: Graphic – How a 3-D lens affects a 2-D movie -Boston.com

[……]

Read more

3Questions – Laser Light Engines

3Questions with LLE logoWhen we think of a digital cinema projector’s light path, we non-optical designers consider the lamp and reflector housing, the condenser lenses and prism assemblies, the DLP or LCOS chip themselves and the lens. There are obviously clever bits in between, for example the optics that will strip the UV and IR from the lamp, physical slits for the light to pass through, as well as techniques for balancing the lamp output for the proper levels of R, G and B.

There is a word that gets used by optics people – etendue – which points to certain characteristics of light that requires the balancing of quantity and angles in a manner that matches the most refined part of the system (in this case the DLP/LCOS device.) This etendue inherently restricts the ability to use more brut force on one end to get more quality light at the other end.

[……]

Read more

The State of Digital Cinema – April 2010 – Part Zero

PlankLogoThis document is Part 0 of an multipart article that details with the basics of today’s transition from film-based cinema to server/file-based digital cinema. This Part 0 addresses some questions that came from readers of Part I, which explains its format and style.


Imagine a rainbow or the light that comes out of a prism. What we think of as the white light of the sun gets split into several discreet, or separate colors.

The next time that you are outside on a sunny day, notice the different shades of blue in the sky as you view it closer or further from the sun. Then later in the day before sunset, notice the colors of the blue as it ranges from deep to light blue and starts to turn orange and then several other shades of red.

There have been a lot of studies that deal with color, and how the human visual system deals with it. There is an international center, the CIE, for all things color and illumination. They did basic work early last century which tried to answer several questions about what an average group of people actually see. They helped settle on methods to scientifically speak about color, and on the best working theory for how the eye (in general) and humans (in particular) see (in general) and see color (in particular.)

[……]

Read more