Tag Archives: lasers

Lessons of Spectre and the Force (WIP)

Dolby has announced that the coming Star Wars Picture is strong with Dolby Vision and Atmos Force…a boson energy that we didn’t know was required when we spent our weekly food budget on Spectre when it opened in the Dolby Cinema | AMC Prime Burbank 16 last month. 

Ouch. Caveat Emptor Dolby said. They don’t control the bookings in that room and oh! by the way, a million to one goes down to the normal state of the dual-laser system of 5000:1. Oh! yes, and by the way, even though it wasn’t in Atmos either, the Dolby Vision entity is a non-vectored mediating boson field that allows for the most perfect of electro-magnetic-mechanical air/photon wave and particle dissemination possible regardless of whether it has had the nuanced half-alluded-to hand wave Jedi mastering artechnology applied to the digits at all. 

I don’t doubt Dolby marketing in the least now. Even though the research elves have found that xenon bulb 4K projectors have a hard time getting to 1800:1 in contrast, they have told me that most Post houses have advanced to 5000:1. In fact, let’s parse what was actually said.

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Lessons of Spectre and the Force (WIP)

Dolby has announced that the coming Star Wars Picture is strong with Dolby Vision and Atmos Force…a boson energy that we didn’t know was required when we spent our weekly food budget on Spectre when it opened in the Dolby Cinema | AMC Prime Burbank 16 last month. 

Ouch. Caveat Emptor Dolby said. They don’t control the bookings in that room and oh! by the way, a million to one goes down to the normal state of the dual-laser system of 5000:1. Oh! yes, and by the way, even though it wasn’t in Atmos either, the Dolby Vision entity is a non-vectored mediating boson field that allows for the most perfect of electro-magnetic-mechanical air/photon wave and particle dissemination possible regardless of whether it has had the nuanced half-alluded-to hand wave Jedi mastering artechnology applied to the digits at all. 

I don’t doubt Dolby marketing in the least now. Even though the research elves have found that xenon bulb 4K projectors have a hard time getting to 1800:1 in contrast, they have told me that most Post houses have advanced to 5000:1. In fact, let’s parse what was actually said.

[……]

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The Spectre of Vision

This weekend brings back Spectre and it is said to be terrific. It should be all the more terrific since it is playing at a local Dolby Vision cinema, an AMC Prime auditorium – The Burbank 16.

It is not a huge room, nor a huge screen. But it is a huge amount of light being thrown across the distance of 16 rows of executive plush leather seats by a couple of souped up Christie built laser projectors, then splashing onto a low gain white screen. Manufactured by Christie, but the secret sauce is all Dolby.

The measured brightness is set for 106 candela per square meter (cd/m2), a term which is often called ‘nits’ in the biz. (If you want the deprecated term of foot-lamberts, divide by pi. ) [edit: We have later been told that the translation from foot lambert to candela per meter square should be on the high side – that is, the dual laser system is putting out 108 cd/m2. The low-gain white screen is critical since the opposite (high-gain and/or high-gain and spray-painted aluminum flakes, often called ‘silver screens’) is notorious for having extremely out of spec hot spots and poor smoothness and dim contrast and horrid vignetting of both darkness and color shift. . . not talked about much since one doesn’t like to pi. . . well, one doesn’t like to do a lot of things that make associates look bad. . . OK. . . associates looking bad might be OK or not OK, but you don’t want clients looking bad, and high-gain screens was one solution for many clients with Dolby 3D systems.  

[……]

Read more

The Spectre of Vision

This weekend brings back Spectre and it is said to be terrific. It should be all the more terrific since it is playing at a local Dolby Vision cinema, an AMC Prime auditorium – The Burbank 16.

It is not a huge room, nor a huge screen. But it is a huge amount of light being thrown across the distance of 16 rows of executive plush leather seats by a couple of souped up Christie built laser projectors, then splashing onto a low gain white screen. Manufactured by Christie, but the secret sauce is all Dolby.

The measured brightness is set for 106 candela per square meter (cd/m2), a term which is often called ‘nits’ in the biz. (If you want the deprecated term of foot-lamberts, divide by pi. ) [edit: We have later been told that the translation from foot lambert to candela per meter square should be on the high side – that is, the dual laser system is putting out 108 cd/m2. The low-gain white screen is critical since the opposite (high-gain and/or high-gain and spray-painted aluminum flakes, often called ‘silver screens’) is notorious for having extremely out of spec hot spots and poor smoothness and dim contrast and horrid vignetting of both darkness and color shift. . . not talked about much since one doesn’t like to pi. . . well, one doesn’t like to do a lot of things that make associates look bad. . . OK. . . associates looking bad might be OK or not OK, but you don’t want clients looking bad, and high-gain screens was one solution for many clients with Dolby 3D systems.  

[……]

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The Laser Trend

Laser Light Engines Logo“Our business model is very much in line with the trend to replace low-efficiency lamps with solid-state solutions, offsetting higher up-front price with lower total cost of ownership.”

This is the take-away quote from Bill Beck of Laser Light Engines in an article that appears in Optics.com after a ShowEast with a good bit of laser buzz. LLE started the trend with an announcement linking them and a large screen project (and investment) with IMAX. Kodak followed this with invitations to see their technology which interestingly uses many lower powered lasers, in a project that will take another two years before productization.

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3D Wonders

exhibition logoProfessional critics are still whining about 3D at the movies. Some is valid, but ill-expressed. None creates the desired effect of educating and motivating a grass-roots effort to insist that the cinemas and studios improve the situation.

This month Patrick Goldstein summarized some of the arguments, and while he had the time and space to round up some past negative articles of others, he spared no space for explaining the good parts of 3D, or the fact that there was plenty of bad CGI in its early days of its evolution. Here is a list of those articles in case our professional readers have been too busy to notice that some part of the populace is speaking out against one-size-fits-all-uncomfortably-glasses and poorly illuminated screens:

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